Perspectives of an Astronaut/Oceanographer

Perspectives of an Astronaut/Oceanographer

Hey everyone! This post is to share this great video link on Sullivan’s perspectives as an astronaut, oceanographer, and educator.

Enjoy

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Powerpoint Presentation: Kathryn D. Sullivan

Kathryn D. Sullivan Powerpoint

The link shown above conists of a powerpoint I made for class on Sullivan. The points bulleted are rather brief, as it is just an outline.

 

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Everyone Dreams Big…Reason as to why I chose Sullivan

 Who is Kathryn D. Sullivan?

Sullivan was born on October 3, 1951 in Paterson, New Jersey. The day after her sixth birthday Sputnik was launched in 1957; she was almost a Sputnik baby. Her mother’s name was Barbara Sullivan and not a lot is known about her other than she is deceased. And as for her Father, Donald Sullivan he was an aerospace engineer for the Marquardt Corporation. He worked on several projects and when Sullivan got involved with the Shuttle Program, the corporations aim was in making reaction control system thrusters for the spacecraft. As a little kid she was intrigued by aircrafts, boats, and the concept of how things worked and what made it work rather than dolls as any other little girl was into. She followed up on all the stories revolving around NASA, space flight, John Glenn and Alan Shepard’s flights.

Why Kathryn D. Sullivan?

I picked Kathryn D. Sullivan because everyone has phases in life as when you were a little kid where you had a  different picked profession every day. I remember being that six year old that claimed was  going to be president one day, a doctor the next, and even an astronaut three days later. One time from being so indecisive I decided I was going to be a mass combination of  being a violinist ballerina astronaut. And I was going to dance and perform in space. As a little kid you dream big and for Sullivan her dreams came true as her persistence led to her being the first American woman in space…you never know where your dreams can take you.

Societies she was involved in:

Some of the societies in which Sullivan was involved in included Woods Hole Oceanographic institution,  The National Academy of
Sciences’ Committee: On Earth and Environmental Sciences, and Board of Directors for The Planetary Society.

  • Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution is known for being one of the “largest private non-profit oceanographic institutions in the world and is dedicated to research and  higher education at the frontiers of ocean science” (WHOI Institution).
  • The Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences for the National Academy of Sciences, “is an honorific society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use
    for the general welfare” (NAS).
  • As head board of director for the Planetary Society, the operation goals is to conduct methods in which the public may interact
    and have active roles in space exploration. In the society they “develop innovative technologies like the first solar sail spacecraft, fund astronomers hunting for hazardous asteroids and planets orbiting other stars, they also support radio and optical searches for extraterrestrial life and they influence decision makers ensuring the future of space exploration” (Planetary Society).

Major Accomplishments:

  • National Air and
    Space Museum Trophy, Smithsonian Institution, 1985
  • Jaycees
    International Ten Outstanding Young Americans Award, 1987
  • NASA Exceptional
    Service Medal, 1988
  • NASA Space Flight
    Medal, 1984, 1990
  • AIAA Haley Apace
    Flight Award, 1991
  • AAS Space Flight
    Achievement Award, 1991
  • Lone Sailor
    Award, U.S. Navy Memorial Foundation
  • “First Woman”
    Award, National First Ladies’ Library and Smithsonian Institution, 2000

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Annotated Bibliography: Kathryn D. Sullivan

 Annotated
Bibliography: Kathryn D. Sullivan

Primary
Sources:

“6 of America’s 8 Woman
Astronauts to Fly in ’84.” New York Times 19 Nov. 1983: 26. Print.

 

Posted on November 19,
1983 by the New York Times is an article on “6 of America’s 8 Woman Astronauts
to Fly in ’84. “ At the time of when the article was printed it says of how the
mission that they were looking forward to was the first mission in which two
women were on the same voyage. It mentions how geologist Sullivan was going to
be the first woman to walk in space along with a several list and brief
descriptions of everyone else going on the space mission.  This source is credible though it doesn’t have
much information on Sullivan herself, for researches it is still useful as it
informs on the crew and important dates for the flights.

Clash, James M. “James M.
Clash: America’s First Woman Space-Walker Remembers Shuttle Rides.” Breaking
News and Opinion on The Huffington Post
. Huffington Post, 6 July 2011. Web.
10 Sept. 2011.
<http://www.huffingtonpost.com/james-m-clash/americas-first-woman-to-w_b_889796.html>.

This piece written by James M. Clash is an
expansive source on Sullivan as it is not only just an article, but also an
interview in which Clash asked Sullivan for her insights on questions we all
wonder about. He states on how “she was the first American woman to walk in
space, outside Challenger in 1984. In 1986 that spacecraft exploded 73 seconds
into flight, killing its crew of seven. Undaunted, Sullivan flew again, not
once but twice. In 1990, she flew on Discovery. Her last flight,
coincidentally, was aboard Atlantis in 1992.” The article is unlimited in the
information towards my research as it even answers the question as to if she
views herself as a role model to young girls. Sullivan simply replies “I have a
twin view. That would have been my first spacewalk if 10,000 people had done it
before me. So, from that point of view, the little historical fact doesn’t play
any role. But when it’s parents, teachers or young high school folks figuring
their way through the world–if I’m identifiable as having something worth
saying to help them figure out the road ahead–that’s an extraordinary opportunity.
So I enjoy that and try to do what I can.”

“Countdown Begins for Shuttle
Liftoff.” ProQuest. New York Times, 4 Oct. 1984. Web. 10 Sept.
2011.
<http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/pqdweb?index=4&did=120458275&SrchMode=2&sid=1&Fmt=10&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=HNP&TS=1315968977&clientId=4340>.

 

This
source is also a New York Times article called “Countdown Begins for Shuttle
Liftoff.” In which it has a lot of valuable information relating to the mission
itself and how they were observing earth and water patterns. The mission in
which was comprised of Sullivan along with Commander Leetsma, was meant for
transferring hydrazine from between two of the ship’s tanks.  This source is beneficial to me for my
research as it depicts of what exactly was the objective of the mission.

 

Hoffman, Shelly. “COSI Columbus
| Press Releases.” COSI Columbus | Dynamic Hands-On Science Center.
Web. 10 Sept. 2011.
<http://www.cosi.org/press-room/press-releases/?year=2006>.

The article “Dr. Kathy Sullivan
Takes New Position” by Shelly Hoffman is a relevant primary source as it tells
of how Sullivan was entitled first director. Her title is the “new Battelle
Center for Mathematics and Science Education Policy at The Ohio State
University’s John Glenn School of Public Affairs.”  The article tells a brief description on some
of the reasons as to why Sullivan was a great candidate for the position of
first director. It illustrates of her dedication and enthusiasm towards the
field of science.

 

“Kathryn D. Sullivan Oral
History.” NASA – Johnson Space Center. National Aeronautics and
Space Administration. Web. 10 Sept. 2011.
<http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/history/oral_histories/SullivanKD/sullivankd.htm>.

 

The
National Aeronautics and Space Administration website offers a wide variety of documents,
which consist of audio content renewed into an outline between the interviewer
and Kathryn Sullivan. There are several dates of interviews ranging from the
years of 2007 to 2009 along with a bibliography data sheet about Kathryn
herself. In the bibliography data sheet, it holds information regarding her
education, military work experience, involvement in NASA, her awards &
citations, and more. This source is highly credible as it is a “history portal”
of records from the Johnson Space Center.  The expect this source to be useful and
supportive of my research on Sullivan as it provides detailed and firsthand
information, for example it tells of how she used to work  as a commander for the US Naval Reserve.

 

 

Secondary
Sources-

Johnson, Lyndon B. “Astronaut
Bio: Kathryn D. Sullivan (03/2009).” NASA – Johnson Space Center.
National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Web. 10 Sept. 2011.
<http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/sullivan-kd.html>.

This
source is a bibliography by the NASA/Johnson Space Center; it is precise and
dependable on the information being given out. It is all about Sullivan on her
personal information, education, organizations, special honors, experience,
NASA experience, and space flight experience. It was written in March in the
year of 2009 and is the “only version available from NASA […] updates must be sought direct from the above named
individual.” As for my research I find it valuable as it answers the question
of how many hours Dr.Sullivan has spent in space over her career; it states
that with the completion of the third mission she had logged in over 532 hours.

Tertiary
Sources-

“Sullivan.”
Encyclopedia Astronautica. Web. 10 Sept. 2011.
<http://www.astronautix.com/astros/sullivan.htm>.

 

The
Encyclopedia Astronautica offers a variety of bibliographical information on
Sullivan’s birthplace, career, education, images, and more.  Some of her accomplishments according to the
material include: “NASA Exceptional Service Medal (1988); Ten Outstanding Young
People of the World Award, Jaycees International (1987); Ten Outstanding Young
Americans Award, U.S. Jaycees (1987); National Air and Space Museum Trophy,
Smithsonian Institution (1985); NASA Space Flight Medal (1984 & 1990); AIAA
Haley Apace Flight Award (1991); AAS Space Flight Achievement Award (1991).” It
would be helpful towards my research on Sullivan as it spaces her life in
chronological order.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Works
Cited As Publicized

“6 of America’s 8
Woman Astronauts to Fly in ’84.” New York Times 19 Nov. 1983: 26.
Print.

Clash, James M.
“James M. Clash: America’s First Woman Space-Walker Remembers Shuttle
Rides.” Breaking News and Opinion on The Huffington Post.
Huffington Post, 6 July 2011. Web. 13 Sept. 2011.
<http://www.huffingtonpost.com/james-m-clash/americas-first-woman-to-w_b_889796.html>.

“Countdown Begins
for Shuttle Liftoff.” ProQuest. New York Times, 4 Oct. 1984. Web.
13 Sept. 2011. <http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/pqdweb?index=4&did=120458275&SrchMode=2&sid=1&Fmt=10&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=HNP&TS=1315968977&clientId=4340>.

Hoffman, Shelly.
“COSI Columbus | Press Releases.” COSI Columbus | Dynamic Hands-On
Science Center
. Web. 10 Sept. 2011. <http://www.cosi.org/press-room/press-releases/?year=2006>.

Johnson, Lyndon B.
“Astronaut Bio: Kathryn D. Sullivan (03/2009).” NASA – Johnson
Space Center
. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Web. 13 Sept.
2011. <http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/sullivan-kd.html>.

“Kathryn D.
Sullivan Oral History.” NASA – Johnson Space Center. National
Aeronautics and Space Administration. Web. 13 Sept. 2011.
<http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/history/oral_histories/SullivanKD/sullivankd.htm>.

“Sullivan.” Encyclopedia
Astronautica
. Web. 14 Sept. 2011.
<http://www.astronautix.com/astros/sullivan.htm>.

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